Curriculum

HYC Junior Sailing is a small program with a high percentage of instructors to sailors. We realize each sailor is unique and no curriculum fits any sailor perfectly. While our curriculum is designed to meet the needs of as many sailors as possible, our instructors also strive to give each sailor individual attention.

Be sure to click on the 'HANDBOOK' link on the top right of this page for complete details about our program's curriculum including all guidelines and rules. 

Typical Daily Schedule

  • Check in at 9:00am  (early morning drop-off option starts at 7:45am) 
  • Group activity and lessons ("chalk talk") 
  • Shuttle children to floating docks to rig boats 
  • Morning sail and on-the-water lessons
  • Return for lunch at picnic tables, followed by pool time
  • Group activity and lesson review 
  • Back to floating docks for afternoon sail and lessons
  • De-rig boats and return for final debriefing
  • Sign out at 4:00pm -- pick-up at picnic tables 
  • Line up for the ice cream truck (not included)
  • Extended day option:  pick up by 5:15pm

Each day our instructors will have a written lesson plan. It is weather dependent and often needs to be altered or advanced following the progress of both individual students and the class as a whole.

Senior Sailors (14+ years old by the end of 2018) learn key safety skills by attending an off-site US Sailing class in Session 1, and may have opportunities to sail on bigger boats and in regattas with our members. The curriculum by itself isn’t worth anything without good or excellent instructors to execute it.  

All of our instructors are US Sailing trained Level 1 certified. They employ auditory, visual, and kinesthetic (VAK) methods to teach sailing using chalk talks, demonstrations, land drills, and on the water drills. All  in fun, entertaining and enjoyable ways.  Our goal is for sailors by the end the summer to want to come back ... and ideally to become life-long sailors.

The session objectives are only a guideline and will not perfectly match the goals or needs of every sailor. They are only examples and will most likely need to be altered to meet the goals and needs of each individual sailor.

Objectives - Table of Contents:

Beginning Opti Curriculum
 
Intermediate Opti Curriculum
 
Advanced Opti Curriculum
 
RS Feva Curriculum
 
Laser Radial Curriculum
 Big Boat Program - Offshore Racing Team

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What's a day like?

Everyday is the same but different. 

What is the same?  

• everyday finding friends • sailing • satisfying lunches enjoyed at our picnic table area • swimming • getting wet • capsizing • having fun • Wedge Thursday * Pizza Friday • ice cream truck at 4 ... 

What is different? 

• going to regattas • making new friends • interesting field trips  • playing in the park • Big Boat Day • Treasure Hunts • Whacky Wednesdays:  Shark Week • Crazy Hat Day • Halloween in July • International Day • Trash Boat Day • running with a watermelon • knot tying contests • No-Wind-Day activities • end of Session BBQ and end of program Awards Dinner ...

One of the club members said this of Junior Sailing:

"I can always tell when the Junior Sailing Program starts:  the kids show up a 9am, they start running all over the place, they are sailing, they are swimming, they seem to be everywhere at once, it's all very exciting ... the Club feels so lonely and quiet in August when its all over."  

 Every week or so during the program The Telltale is distributed to the families.  It'll give you a good idea of the different activities that happen during the summer. Older copies of The Telltale can be found on the Media Page.  

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Beginner Optimist

After three weeks, a Beginner Optimist sailor should know how to ...

Safety
• Follow program and harbor rules Be safety conscious
• Stay protected from the sun
• Use a safety whistle appropriately Avoid collisions
• Put on and take off a PFD in the water
• Tread water without a PFD for two minutes in the sea Get in the safety position
• Capsize and recover
• Execute a squall/storm drill

Seamanship
• Be comfortable in an Opti on the water
• Tie an 8-knot, square knot, cleat knot, bowline, half hitch, and clove hitch Coil and throw a line
• Rig and de-rig
• Name the parts of an Opti
• Know where the wind is coming from
• Take care of his or her boat
- proper and neat stowing and securing
- washing
• Use the paddle while steering
• Steer responsibly on a tow
• Stay out of the no-go-zone except when tacking Recover from irons

Boathandling
• Leave the dock
• Return to the dock
• Maintain proper body position and weight placement in the boat Hold the tiller and mainsheet correctly
• Gybe
• Tack
• Reach
• Run
• Sail upwind
• Sail a figure eight
• Sail a triangle
• Sail a square

Sportsmanship
• Respect others
• View sailing as a team sport
• Work in a team during rigging and activities

 


 

After six weeks, a Beginner Optimist sailor should also know how to ...

Seamanship
• Tie sail ties
• Attach a sail onto spars Do simple navigation
- North, South, East, West - recognizing landmarks
- navigation buoys
- water depth
• Identify current and tides
• Recognize the approach of puffs and lulls Explain how a sail works
- push
- pull
• Use sailing as a way to get somewhere Row
• Anchor
• Sail as passenger or crew on a big boat

Boathandling
• Use telltales for upwind steering
• Sit (and where) for different wind and water conditions
• Adjust the daggerboard for different conditions
• Maintain proper weight and body balance in the boat
• Stop and start
• Adjust (when and why) sail controls
- sprit pole tension
- outhaul
- vang stop
- boom vang
• Execute a 360

Racing
• Understand sportsmanship in racing Start
• Round a mark
• Find clear air

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Intermediate Optimist

At the end of six weeks, an Intermediate Optimist sailor should know how to ...

Safety
• Follow program and harbor rules
• Stay protected from the sun
• Be safety conscious (Rule 1)
• Use a safety whistle appropriately
• Put on and take off a PFD in the water
• Tread water without a PFD for two minutes in the sea
• Avoid collisions
• Get in the safety position
• Capsize and recover
• Execute a squall/storm drill

Seamanship
• Avoid contact (Rule 14)
• Use windward/leeward (Rule 11)
• Use Starboard/Port (Rule 10)
• Use clear ahead/clear astern (Rule 12)
• Be comfortable in an Opti on the water
• Tie an 8-knot, square knot, cleat knot, bowline, half hitch, and clove hitch
• Coil and throw a line
• Identify points of sail
• Know where the wind is coming from
• Explain actual vs. apparent wind
• Rig and de-rig properly
• Name the parts of an Opti
• Take care of a boat
- proper and neat stowing and securing - washing boats
- checking sail for ties
- tying ties
• Check mast preventer Explain how a sail works
- push
- pull
• Do simple navigation
- North, South, East, West - recognizing landmarks
- navigation buoys
- water depth
- reading a chart
- using a compass
• Recognize the approach of puffs and lulls Use the paddle while steering
• Steer responsibly on a tow
• Attach a sail onto spars
• Recognize and sail in currents and tides Assess weather
- simple weather systems
- clouds and what they mean - wind and weather
- weather reports
- barometric pressure
• Use sailing as a way to get somewhere Row
• Anchor
• Sail as passenger or crew on a big boat

Boathandling
• Leave the dock
• Return to the dock
• Stay out of the no-go-zone except when tacking
• Recover from irons
• Maintain proper body position and weight placement in the boat
• Hold the tiller and mainsheet correctly
• Gybe
- s gybe as apposed to c gybe
- pull in sail and center tiller Tack
• Sail downwind
- reach
- run
- sail trim dictated by where wind is
- body position and placement
- steering
- sail by the lee
• Upwind sailing
- close-hauled
- steering a straight course.....paying attention - watching for speed and balloon in luff
- telltales
• Sail a figure eight
• Sail a triangle
• Sail a square
• Use telltales for upwind steering
• Stop and start
- heading into wind
- backwinding sail
- pull in and head off
• Execute a 360
• Adjust the daggerboard for different conditions and points of sail
• Where, when, and how to sit
• Position body weight
- steering with weight
- how body placement and movement affects the boat - for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
• Adjust sail shape (when and why)
- outhaul
- boom vang
- gooseneck
- sprit tension
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
• Sail backwards

Sportsmanship
• Respect others
• Respect equipment
• View sailing as a team sport
• Work in a team during rigging and activities

Racing
• Understand sportsmanship in racing
- responsibility
- fair sailing
• Use tacking rules (Rule 13)
• Sail a starting sequence
- clear air
• Avoid la-la land
• Assess wind on a course Round a mark
- the mechanics of it
- basic applications of Rule 18 Finish
• Act on puffs and lulls
• Adjust sail controls for different legs Adjust weight for speed
• Find clear air
• Use rules in racing
• Execute a 360 when foul occurs 

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Advanced Optimist

At the end of six to twelve weeks, an Advanced Optimist sailor should know how to ...

Safety
• Follow program and harbor rules
• Stay protected from the sun
• Be safety conscious (Rule 1)
• Use a safety whistle appropriately
• Put on and take off a PFD in the water
• Tread water without a PFD for two minutes in the sea
• Avoid collisions
• Get in the safety position
• Capsize and recover
• Execute a squall/storm drill

Seamanship

• Avoid contact (Rule 14)
• Use windward/leeward (Rule 11)
• Use Starboard/Port (Rule 10)
• Use clear ahead/clear astern (Rule 12)
• Be comfortable in an Opti on the water
• Tie an 8-knot, square knot, cleat knot, bowline, half hitch, and clove hitch Coil and throw a line
• Identify points of sail
• Know where the wind is coming from
• Explain actual vs. apparent wind
• Name the parts of an Opti
• Recognize the approach of puffs and lulls
• Explain how a sail works
- push
- pull
- daggerboard as a foil
• Take care of a boat
- proper and neat stowing and securing
- checking sail for ties
- tying sail ties
- jury rigging
- washing and waxing boats
- minor repairs
• Attach a sail onto spars Do simple navigation
- North, South, East, West
- recognizing and using landmarks
- navigation buoys
- water depth
- reading a chart
- using a compass
• Rig and de-rig properly
• Use the paddle while steering
• Steer responsibly on a tow
• Do a MOB recovery
• Recognize and sail in currents and tides
- tide charts
- current indicators Assess weather
- simple weather systems
- clouds and what they mean - wind and weather
- weather reports
- barometric pressure
• Use sailing as a way to get somewhere
• Row
• Anchor
• Sail as passenger or crew on a big boat Check mast preventer

Boathandling
• Leave the dock
• Return to the dock
• Maintain proper body position and weight placement in the boat
• Hold the tiller and mainsheet correctly
• Stay out of the no-go-zone except when tacking
• Recover from irons
• Gybe
- s gybe as apposed to c gybe
- pull in sail and center tiller
- mechanics
- rolling
- gybing in waves
• Tack
- mechanics
- rolling
- rules (Rule 13)
- tacking in waves
• Sail downwind
- reach
- run
- sail trim dictated by where wind is
- adjusting trim
- adjusting sail controls
- body position and placement
- steering
- awareness
- pumping on crests
- steering waves
- sail by the lee
• Upwind sailing
- sail shape and trim
- close-hauled
- finding and holding “the groove”
- watching for speed and balloon in luff
- telltales
- sailing over waves
- hiking
• Stop and start
- heading into wind
- backwinding sail
- pull in and head off
• Adjust the daggerboard for different conditions and points of sail
• Adjust sail shape (when and why)
- outhaul = adjust foot tension and control depth of sail
- boom vang = downwind leech tension
- vang stop = adjust luff tension and control draft position
- sprit tension = control shape
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
- mast rake
- sail ties
• Position body weight
- challenging the body on the boat
- steering with weight
- how body placement and movement affects the boat
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
- quiet and gentle movement
• Execute a 360
• Execute a windsurfer tack
• Sail backwards

Sportsmanship
• Respect others
• Respect equipment
• View sailing as a team sport
• Work in a team during rigging and activities

Racing
• Organize his or herself for competition in a regatta Understand sportsmanship in racing
- responsibility
- fair sailing
• Sail all standard race courses
- triangle
- modified triangle
- modified Olympic
- windward/leeward
- offset marks
- Harry Anderson
• Assess wind on a course React to wind shifts
- tack on headers
- stay on lifts
• Sail through puffs and lulls
- spotting them
- reacting to them Sail through wind shifts
- recognizing them
- headers
- lifts
• Adjust sail controls for different legs
• Adjust weight for speed
• Find clear air
• Apply racing tactics
• Start
- mechanics
- favored end
- current
- line sight
- strategies & tactics
- timing (watches and mind)
- rules and things to watch for
• Avoid la-la land
• Round a mark
- the mechanics of it
- wide and tight
- tactics
- advanced applications of Rule 18
• Finish
- dueling tactics
- sportsmanship in finishing
• Execute penalty turns
• Use rules in racing
• Deal with protests and arbitration
- knowing the rules
- knowing who to ask
- sportsmanship and hearing
- mock protests and scenarios

– Back to Top –

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RS Feva

After six weeks, a RS Feva sailor should know how to ...

Safety
• Follow program and harbor rules 
• Stay protected from the sun
• Be safety conscious (Rule 1)
• Use a safety whistle appropriately
• Put on and take off a PFD in the water
• Tread water without a PFD for two minutes in the sea
• Avoid collisions
• Get in the safety position
• Capsize and recover
• Execute a squall/storm drill

Sportsmanship
• Avoid contact (Rule 14)
• Use windward/leeward (Rule 11)
• Use Starboard/Port (Rule 10)
• Use clear ahead/clear astern (Rule 12)
• Changing course (Rule 16)
• Be comfortable in a RS Feva on the water
• Tie an 8-knot, square knot, cleat knot, bowline, half hitch, and clove hitch
• Coil and throw a line
• Relate the RS Feva to a larger boat
• Know where the wind is coming from
• Explain actual vs. apparent wind
• Name the parts of a RS Feva
• Identify points of sail
• Explain how a sail works
- push
- pull
• Rig and de-rig properly each day
• Rig and de-rig properly for storage and trailering (de-masting)
• Steer responsibly on a tow
• Execute a MOB recovery
• Anchor
• Do simple navigation
- North, South, East, West
- recognizing landmarks
- navigation buoys
- water depth
- reading a chart
- using a compass
- using instruments
• Recognize and sail in currents and tides
- affects of current
- how to see current
- tide charts
• Assess weather
- simple weather systems
- clouds and what they mean
- wind and weather
- weather reports
- barometric pressure
• Use sailing as a way to get somewhere
• Take care of a boat
- proper and neat stowing and securing
- washing boats
- getting repairs taken care of
• Recognize and address the approach of puffs and lulls
- how to spot
- what to do
• Recognize and react to wind shifts
- headers
- lifts
• Row
• Sail as passenger or crew on a big boat

Boathandling
• Leave the dock
• Return to the dock
• Stay out of the no-go-zone except when tacking
• Recover from irons
• Maintain proper body position and weight placement in the boat
• Hold the tiller and mainsheet correctly
• Understand what is required of the different crew positions in a RS Feva
• Stop and start
- heading into wind
- backwinding sail
- pull in and head off
• Gybe
- s gybe as apposed to c gybe
- pull in sail and center tiller
• Tack
- position duties
- mechanics
- rolling
- letting the jib go
- trimming jib and main as you find “the groove”
• Sail downwind
- reach
- run
- sail trim dictated by where wind is
- body position and placement
- steering
- sail by the lee
- jib trim
- main trim
- skipper and crew’s jobs
- daggerboard position
• Upwind sailing
- close-hauled
- steering a straight course.....paying attention
- setting main trim
- setting jib trim
- steering by telltales
- hiking
- skipper and crew’s jobs
• Sail a figure eight
• Sail a triangle
• Sail a square
• Sail a sausage
• Adjust the daggerboard for different conditions and points of sail 
• Execute a 360
• Where, when, and how to sit
• Position body weight
- steering with weight
- how body placement and movement affects the boat
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
• Adjust sail shape using sail controls (when and why)
- outhaul
- boom vang
- cunningham
- halyard tension
- for different weather conditions - for different points of sail
• Fly a spinnaker
- Rigging the spinnaker
-- packing
-- mechanics
-- things to remember (top or bottom of jib)
-- sheet vs. tackling
-- fixing the sprit pole
-- re-packing while sailing or racing
-- re-running lines while sailing or racing
-- flying without a pole
- Hoists and takedowns
-- skipper and crew’s jobs and routines
-- what to do with the jib
-- mechanics
- Flying the spinnaker
-- sheet vs. tackline
-- trimming the sheet
-- tackling height
- Gybing the spinnaker
-- skipper and crew’s jobs and routines
-- gybing the main
-- gybing the chute
-- gybing the pole
- Spinnakers close to a beam reach
-- hiking
- Using the spinnaker on courses
-- estimating timing
-- timing and marks
• Sail backwards
• Sail rudderless

Sportsmanship
• Respect others
• Respect equipment
• View sailing as a team sport
• Work with a team member in the same boat
• Work in a team during rigging and activities

Racing
• Understand sportsmanship in racing - responsibility
- fair sailing
• Start
- mechanics
- sequence
- keeping track of time
- rules
- clear air
- favored end
- first row
• Find clear air
• Avoid la-la land Round a mark
- the mechanics of it
- basic applications of Rule 18
- wide and tight
• Execute a 720
• Assess wind on a course
• Act on puffs and lulls
- tack on headers
- stay on lifts
• Adjust sail controls for different legs
• Adjust weight for speed
• Use rules in racing
• Work through a simple protest hearing
- how to use rules in racing
- sportsmanship
- presentation
• Finish

– Back to Top –

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Laser Radial

After six to twelve weeks, a Laser Radial sailor should know how to.......

Safety
• Follow program and harbor rules
• Stay protected from the sun
• Be safety conscious (Rule 1)
• Use a safety whistle appropriately
• Put on and take off a PFD in the water
• Tread water without a PFD for two minutes in the sea • Avoid collisions
• Get in the safety position • Capsize and recover • Execute a squall/storm drill

Seamanship
• Avoid contact (Rule 14)
• Use windward/leeward (Rule 11)
• Use Starboard/Port (Rule 10)
• Use clear ahead/clear astern (Rule 12)
• Be comfortable in a Laser on the water
• Tie an 8-knot, square knot, cleat knot, bowline, half hitch, and clove hitch Coil and throw a line
• Identify points of sail
• Name the parts of a Laser
• Know where the wind is coming from
• Explain actual vs. apparent wind
• Recognize the approach of puffs and lulls
• Explain how a sail works
- push
- pull
- daggerboard as a foil
• Rig and de-rig properly
• Attach a sail onto spars
• Cartop and transport safely and properly Steer responsibly on a tow
• Do a MOB recovery
• Do simple navigation
- North, South, East, West
- recognizing and using landmarks - navigation buoys
- water depth
- reading a chart
- using a compass
• Recognize and sail in currents and tides - tide charts
- current indicators Assess weather
- simple weather systems
- clouds and what they mean - wind and weather
- weather reports
- barometric pressure
• Use sailing as a way to get somewhere
• Take care of a boat
- proper and neat stowing and securing - washing boats
- jury rigging
- minor repairs
• Row
• Anchor
• Sail as passenger or crew on a big boat

Boathandling
• Leave the dock
• Return to the dock
• Maintain proper body position and weight placement in the boat • Hold the tiller and mainsheet correctly
• Stay out of the no-go-zone except when tacking
• Recover from irons
• Gybe
- s gybe as apposed to c gybe
- pull in sail and center tiller - mechanics
- rolling
- gybing in waves
 • Tack
- mechanics
- rolling
- rules (Rule 13)
- tacking in waves
• Downwind Sailing
- reach
- run
- sail trim dictated by where wind is
- adjusting trim
- adjusting sail controls
- body position and placement
- steering
- awareness
- pumping on crests
- steering waves
- sail by the lee
• Upwind sailing
- sail shape and tri m
- close-hauled
- finding and holding “the groove”
- watching for speed and balloon in luff
- telltales
- sailing over waves
- hiking
• Stop and start
- heading into wind
- backwinding sail
- pull in and head off
• Adjust the daggerboard for different conditions and points of sail
• Adjust sail shape (when and why)
- outhaul = adjust foot tension and control depth of sail
- boom vang = downwind leech tension
- cunningham = adjust luff tension and contro l draft position - mainsheet = control of speed and pointing
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
• Where, when, and how to sit Position body weight
- challenging the body on the boat
- steering with weight
- how body placement and movement affects the boat
- for different weather conditions
- for different points of sail
- quiet and gentle movement
• Sail backwards
• Execute a 720
• Execute a windsurfer tack

Sportsmanship
• Respect others
• Respect equipment
• View sailing as a team sport
• Work in a team during rigging and activities

Racing
• Organize his or herself for competition in a regatta
• Understand sportsmanship in racing
- responsibility
- fair sailing
• Assess wind on a course
• Act on puffs and lulls
• Adjust sail controls for different legs
• Adjust weight for speed
• Find clear air
• React to wind shifts
- tack on headers
- stay on lifts
• Sail through puffs and lulls
- spotting them
- reacting to them
• Sail through wind shifts
- recognizing them
- headers
- lifts
• Sail all standard race courses
- triangle
- modified triangle
- modified Olympic
- windward/leeward
- offset marks
- gate marks
- harry anderson
• Apply racing tactics
• Start
- mechanics
- favored end
- current
- line sight
- strategies & tactics
- timing (watches and mind)
- rules and things to watch for
• Avoid la-la land
• Round a mark
- the mechanics of it
- wide and tight
- tactics
- advanced applications of Rule 18
• Finish
- dueling tactics
- sportsmanship in finishing
• Use all racing rules competently
• Deal with protests and arbitration
- knowing the rules
- knowing who to ask
- sportsmanship and hearing

– Back to Top –